BREEAM Mat 05: Designing for durability and resilience

It is important to consider the longevity of the asset and how it will perform during operation. Potential building owners and occupiers will prefer buildings that will have lower life cycle costs and are less disruptive to business activities. For this reason, BREEAM awards credits to schemes that can demonstrate that the design and specification will lead to fewer repairs and replacements resulting from operational wear and tear.

The Mat 05 ‘Designing for durability and resilience‘ category awards schemes that can demonstrate how, in higher risk areas, suitable durability and protection measures have been included. These measures mitigate damage from operational wear and tear, increase the life expectancy, and reduce maintenance and replacement of vulnerable building elements.

The Mat 05 credit has a logical connection to the Wst 05 ‘Adaptation to climate change’ category, as both categories are concerned with the durability and functional performance of the scheme. Pursuing both categories will yield more credits and improve the durability of your scheme. More information on the Wst 05 credit here.

Meeting the Requirements

To be awarded the Mat 05 ‘Designing for durability and resilience’ credit requires evidence that the risk and incidence of common durability failures arising from relatively harsh in-use conditions, and relatively aggressive internal and external environmental conditions, have been assessed and mitigated.

New schemes can be optimised against material deterioration, reducing the need for frequent repairs and replacement. Deterioration comes both naturally (wear and tear) and from climate change (increased frequency of extreme weather events).

The BREEAM New Construction 2018 standard offers one credit (Mat 05) for schemes that demonstrate quality material use in both the internal and external elements.

Protecting vulnerable parts of the building from damage

The vulnerable elements of the interior and exterior structure are evaluated for their durability, including –

  • Corridors and lifts (high intensity areas)
  • Damage from operating vehicles (to walls, doors)
  • Damage from parking collisions to the building façade
  • Potential malicious damage (from unpredictable sources)

We will appraise the design and material specifications of the mentioned elements against the respective quality standards acknowledged by BREEAM.

Examples include installing door stoppers, kick plates, protection rails and other life-enhancing material.

Protecting exposed parts of the building from material degradation

The exposed (exterior) elements of the structure are evaluated for their resilience against material degradation. Schemes can demonstrate suitable considerations on various elements, including:

Building Elements:

  • Foundation/substructure/lowest floor/retaining walls
  • External walls
  • Roof/balconies
  • Glazing: windows, skylight
  • External doors
  • Railing/balusters
  • Cladding
  • Staircase/ramps
  • Hard landscaping

Environmental Factors:

  • Solar radiation
  • Temperature variation
  • Wind
  • Extreme weather
  • Vegetation
  • Pests, insects
  • Air/ Ground contaminants
  • Water Damage

Other Requirements

  • The building must feature convenient access to roof and façade to facilitate cost-efficient repair and replacement
  • The roof and façade must be designed to prevent water damage, ingress, and ponding (unless explicitly intended)

We will appraise the design and material specifications of the mentioned elements against the respective quality standards acknowledged by BREEAM.

New schemes can be designed with durable and resilient material in the building and landscape, thereby minimising repairs and replacement.

The BREEAM New Construction 2014 standard offers one credit (Mat 05) for schemes that demonstrate sufficient protection for both the internal and external elements.

Protecting vulnerable parts of the building from damage

The vulnerable elements of the interior and exterior structure are evaluated for their durability. These include:

  • Corridors and lifts (high intensity areas)
  • Damage from operating vehicles (to walls, doors)
  • Damage from parking collisions to the building façade

We will appraise the design and material specifications of the mentioned elements against the respective quality standards acknowledged by BREEAM.

Examples include installing door stoppers, kick plates, protection rails and other life-enhancing material.

Protecting exposed parts of the building from material degradation

The exposed (exterior) elements of the structure are evaluated for their resilience against material and environmental degradation. Schemes must demonstrate suitable considerations on various elements, including:

Building Elements:

  • Foundation/substructure/lowest floor/retaining walls
  • External walls
  • Roof/balconies
  • Glazing: windows, skylight
  • External doors
  • Railing/balusters
  • Cladding
  • Staircase/ramps
  • Hard landscaping

Environmental Factors:

  • Solar radiation
  • Temperature variation
  • Wind
  • Extreme weather
  • Vegetation
  • Pests, insects
  • Air/ Ground contaminants
  • Water Damage

We will determine if whether the design and material considerations meet the appropriate quality standards acknowledged by BREEAM. If such is not possible (i.e. material not mentioned in standards), we will appraise the elected design and material considerations against their respective degradation sources.

Refurbishments are excellent opportunities for schemes to replace their old material for the latest, durable material.

The BREEAM Non-Domestic Refurbishment 2014 standard offers one credit (Mat 05) for schemes that demonstrate sufficient protection for both the internal and external elements.

Protecting vulnerable parts of the building from damage

The vulnerable elements of the interior and exterior structure are evaluated for their durability, including –

  • Corridors and lifts (high intensity areas)
  • Damage from operating vehicles (to walls, doors)
  • Damage from parking collisions to the building façade

We will appraise the design and material specifications of the mentioned elements against the respective quality standards acknowledged by BREEAM.

Examples include installing door stoppers, kick plates, protection rails and other life-enhancing material.

Protecting exposed parts of the building from material degradation

The exposed (exterior) elements of the structure are evaluated for their resilience against material and environmental degradation. Schemes must demonstrate suitable considerations on various elements, including:

Building Elements:

  • Foundation/substructure/lowest floor/retaining walls
  • External walls
  • Roof/balconies
  • Glazing: windows, skylight
  • External doors
  • Railing/balusters
  • Cladding
  • Staircase/ramps
  • Hard landscaping

Environmental Factors:

  • Solar radiation
  • Temperature variation
  • Wind
  • Extreme weather
  • Vegetation
  • Pests, insects
  • Air/ Ground contaminants
  • Water Damage 

Other Requirements:

  • Environmental and material factors pertaining to the scheme must be identified and mitigated, including
    • Environmental impact on existing building elements
    • Potential degradation of the existing building elements

We will appraise the design and material specifications of the mentioned elements against the respective quality standards acknowledged by BREEAM.

Empty section. Edit page to add content here.

ADW Developments has substantial expertise, the recognised qualifications, and the necessary experience in undertaking Durability studies to meet the BREEAM requirements.

 

Our service for BREEAM Mat 05 Designing for durability and resilience is inexpensive, worthy and a great credit to target for your project.

Get a Quote

What service are you interested in? *

Have a discount code?

Paste your AdWords Remarketing code here